FCCCO Live - Videoblog

14/07/2015

Summary

  • Interview of Enrique Marijuan, country manage
  • Works in execution.

Enrique Marijuan

Country Manager de FCC Construcción en Perú y Chile

 

How long have you been working at FCC Construcción Chile and Peru?

Since the beginning of 2011; I participated in the establishment of FCC in these countries.

Describe your career path

At the beginning of my career I was employed at another company, initially working on civil engineering tenders and subsequently moving to different positions of responsibility on work sites, essentially in the construction of toll highways in Spain during the period of large infrastructure projects.

With this experience under my belt, I decided to take advantage of an opportunity at FCC to occupy a position of responsibility overseas, specifically in the construction of highways in Costa Rica. After a few years I expanded my field of activity and began to assist the company in the management of other contracts that they had in other Central American countries.

In 2011 the company offered me the possibility of forming part of the team that would embark on the adventure of opening up markets in some strategic countries throughout South America. I have now been leading the team in Peru and Chile for 4 years.

How do you open up a market when arriving in a new country? Difficulties? Opportunities?

“Each country is a different world, which must be discovered step by step.”

Each country is a different world, which must be discovered step by step. You could say that there are a series of concepts that are basic and common to any new market, which must be explored in each one of the countries in which the company intends to operate: legal framework and its relationship with an international company, type of corporate form that is appropriate in order to operate in said country, fiscal matters,… Subsequently, it is important to know the general functioning of the construction market (possible partners, tender requirements and the administrative and legal limits that we will face, amongst other issues).

After obtaining this information and controlling this scenario, it is then necessary to begin developing the necessary commercial work to culminate the establishment in the country; work that has no limits and is difficult, because at the beginning FCC is unknown. Step by step you begin to have access to possible clients, partners, projects and business opportunities.

What infrastructure development plans are expected in South America?

“South America, as occurs with the rest of Latin America, is formed by countries with enormous infrastructure development opportunities.”

South America, as occurs with the rest of Latin America, is formed by countries with enormous infrastructure development opportunities. Not only are the different infrastructure plans mentioned attractive, the expected investment on the part of private clients is also impressive, in that we are dealing with countries in which the energy deficit (essential for the development of a country) and the development of infrastructure for mining (one of their main sources of revenues) are resulting in billion dollar investments.

How is the Chilean / Peruvian construction markets?

They are very different markets; Chile is a more mature market with a very consolidated administrative and legal stability. Peru, however, is a market in which the stability is in the consolidation phase, with a recent economic past behind it that makes it an attractive market for a company like ours. The majority of private clients with the greatest potential (in terms of energy and mining) are common to both countries.

What does FCC contribute? How do we create value?

“We are global while at the same time local, and when we open a market the works create extraordinary value in the community. The construction sector is a sector that invigorates the economy, and this translates into the creation of employment.”

Our company’s main calling card is our experience, our references and our size, capable of dealing with any technical challenge put before us, and tackling large-scale civil engineering projects.

We are global while at the same time local, and when we open a market the works create extraordinary value in the community. The construction sector is a sector that invigorates the economy, and this translates into the creation of employment. Additionally, we already possess experience consolidated in other Latin American countries, which undoubtedly serves as a reference and facilitates our access to clients and future partners.

Which projects would you highlight as our main projects?

I would say that they have all been important for one reason or another. In Chile the work to improve Cuesta Las Chilcas has been a very tough challenge, in that it involved working while managing the traffic of one of the country’s most densely populated roads, but I cannot fail to mention the works that we have in the south of the country, Puerto Nuevo-Quillalco, with a special bridge where FCC has shown its experience with the construction solutions adopted, stressing the professionalism of the team that was able to coexist within an environment offering very limited resources for the work.

With respects to Peru, I do not think that it is necessary to mention the complexity of the expansion work of the Muelle Norte de Callao, with the added difficulty of coexisting with a fully operational port; I also do not wish to omit the effort and the example that we set with the sporting complex of Trujillo, where we able to get President Humala to cut the inauguration ribbon of the main installations less than ten months after the commencement of the work. The professional quality of the FCC team that worked on this project, and their efforts, were the genuine reasons for this success.

“…the recently awarded L2 of the Lima Metro, one of the most important metro construction projects in the world, with a social impact and reputational boost for our company that is unprecedented.”

What future projects are we working on?

Currently I think that special mention must be made to the recently awarded L2 of the Lima Metro, one of the most important metro construction projects in the world, with a social impact and reputational boost for our company that is unprecedented.

We are continuously searching for new challenges, and hopefully we will soon be able to offer fresh good news on the consolidation of FCC in these countries.

How many people currently work for FCC in these countries?

More than 1,200 employees, taking into account the construction teams. The creation of local employment is very important for FCC. For instance, 95% of the employees at Puerto del Callao are Peruvian.

How are we valued by our clients?

“…we work with the values that have always differentiated FCC, seriousness, rigour in the compliance of contracts, and quality in the execution.”

It is too soon to give a response, but I believe their opinion will be interesting once we have completed the ongoing contracts. Of course we work with the values that have always differentiated FCC, seriousness, rigour in the compliance of contracts, and quality in the execution. Always with the intention of giving our clients the best service.

Value your international experience. What you like and dislike the most?

To be honest it would be very hard for me to say something bad about my experiences abroad, it is a great opportunity as a professional, with the possibility of comprehensive career development, in that you need to participate in many of the activities that are a part of a company like ours.

From a personal perspective it is an experience that I absolutely recommend, the family bond attained is of great value, both with respects to your partner, as well as in the education of your children. I already experienced this during my childhood with my parents, and I live it now as if I had won the lottery a second time.

If I would have to state something bad, I think it would be the distance between you and your loved ones, it is very tough on some occasions. In particular, it saddens me that my small children don’t have their grandparents and cousins close, in my case we have been abroad 8 years, and sometimes it takes its toll. For now, in my family we are a team, and while I have their support we will continue with this adventure.

 

Works in execution

The Port of Callao, Peru

Expansion of one of the biggest ports in the Pacific

Puerto_Callao_Peru

The Port of Callao, located in the far east of the city of Lima, is considered the most important in Peru and the biggest in the Pacific in South America.

APM Terminal hired FCC to carry out the expansion works on the port. The northern dock currently has a capacity of five hundred thousand containers. However, the expansion works could see this number rise to one million containers annually in the northern dock.

The project includes the construction of stages I and II of the port: the remodelling of dock 11 (the grain dock) and the northern part of Dock 5, which will mean bigger vessels can dock: Gran Post Panamás.

The works consisted of demolishing part of the old existing piling docks, building new docks on steel pilings, demolishing all old buildings and pavements and newly building all service, pavement, and building infrastructure for different uses.

Docks 5 and 11 were demolished, as well as 18 buildings within the port. The total length of dock 11 is 280 metres and dock 5 560 metres. Dock 5 is to be used for container management and mineral loading, whereas dock 11 provides port services for the importation of agricultural products and has cement silos.

The remodelling works also include the construction of an administrative building (with two floors), a public office building (with 5 floors plus rooftop), a maintenance workshop and other minor works.

The customer required a first delivery in dock 5 as they bought some container loading cranes in China and this part of the dock had to be finished for them to be installed. FCC followed through with their commitment and when the cargo arrived, the new maritime platform was ready for them to be installed.

The works on the port will modernise this port infrastructure to adapt it to the current demands of the cargo transport system and make it suitable for the ship dimensions and the depth of water, as well as providing it with more efficient equipment in accordance with the different types of cargo that will circulate in the port.

The 165 million Euro works began in March 2013 and will finish in October this year.

 Lima Metro, Peru

Metro_Lima_Peru

In June 2014 the consortium led by ACS and FCC won the 3.9 billion Euro contract for the design, construction, financing, operation and maintenance of line 2 of the Lima Metro, as well as a branch of line 4 which will go as far as the airport. Construction is expected to take five years, after which operation will begin and last for 30 years.

The winning consortium of the tender (called New Lima Metro) is led by Dragados and Iridium, subsidiaries of the ACS Group, and also FCC, by means of their subsidiary Vialia, along with the Italian companies Impregilo and Ansaldo. The latter will take care of the equipment for the electromechanical systems and rolling stock and the local company, Cosapi. Madrid Metro will also participate as project advisor.

The project awarded involves the construction of 35 underground metro stations joined by 35 kilometres of tunnels. More than 3,000 professionals will participate in the works. Choosing an underground transport system will have a lesser impact on city life, as well as providing real urban renewal since a lot of the surface land where the new Metro will run will be turned into green zones.

Line 2 will be almost 27 kilometres long and will cover the East-West axis of Lima from Ate to Callao, where FCC is also carrying out refurbishment works on the port in this town. Once up and running, its 27 passenger stations will provide service to more than 600,000 people per day who will save up to 90 minutes on their journey. It currently takes two hours and twenty minutes to do this journey by car.

Meanwhile, the branch of line 4 that will link the Peruvian capital to the airport will run through eight kilometres of tunnels from Avenida Faucett to Avenida Néstor Gambetta. Eight stations will be built on this route.

Additionally, the contract includes executing the superstructure, the rolling stock supply, the installation of electromechanical equipment , the rail systems and electrical supply necessary for the metro to operate.

Solvency and global benchmarks

The project presented by the consortium to Proinversión (Private Investment Promotion Agency), a body belonging to the Ministry of Transport, will put the metropolitan area of Lima on the cutting edge of sustainable urban transport. Once up and running, it will provide service to more than 600,000 people per day who will save up to 90 minutes on their journey.

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